scientific-excuses-for-why-humans-havent-found-aliens-yet

9 Strange, Scientific Excuses for Why Humans Haven’t Found Aliens Yet

One night about 60 years ago, physicist Enrico Fermi looked up into the sky and asked, “Where is everybody?”

He was talking about aliens.

Today, scientists know that there are millions, perhaps billions of planets in the universe that could sustain life. So, in the long history of everything, why hasn’t any of this life made it far enough into space to shake hands (or claws … or tentacles) with humans? It could be that the universe is just too big to traverse. space science universe and space station alien science

It could be that the aliens are deliberately ignoring us. It could even be that every growing civilization is irrevocably doomed to destroy itself (something to look forward to, fellow Earthlings). space science universe and space station alien science

Or, it could be something much, much weirder. Like what, you ask? Here are nine strange answers that scientists have proposed for Fermi’s paradox. space science universe and space station alien science

The aliens are hiding in underground oceans.

Aliens hiding under oceans

space science universe and space station alien science
JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute/NASA space science universe and space station alien science

If humans hope to converse with ET, we’ll need to have a few icebreakers handy. No, seriously — alien life is probably trapped in secret oceans buried deep inside frozen planets. space science universe and space station alien science

Subsurface oceans of liquid water slosh beneath multiple moons in our solar system and may be common throughout the Milky Way, astronomers say. NASA physicist Alan Stern thinks clandestine water worlds like these could provide a perfect stage for evolving life, even if inhospitable surface conditions plague those plants. “Impacts and solar flares, and nearby supernovae, and what orbit you’re in, and whether you have a magnetosphere, and whether there’s a poisonous atmosphere — none of those things matter” for life that’s underground. space science universe and space station alien science

That’s great for the aliens, but it also means we’ll never be able to detect them just by glancing at their planets with a telescope. Can we expect them to contact us? Heck, Stern said — these critters live so deep, we can’t even expect them to know that there’s a sky over their heads. space science universe and space station alien science

The aliens are imprisoned on “super-Earths.”

Aliens on super-earths

space science universe and space station alien science
JPL-Caltech/NASA space science universe and space station alien science

No, “super-Earth” is not Captain Planet’s dorky cousin. In astronomy, the term refers to a type of planet with a mass up to 10 times greater than Earth’s. Star surveys have turned up oodles of these worlds that could have the right conditions for liquid water. This means alien life could conceivably be evolving on super-Earths all over the universe. space science universe and space station alien science

Unfortunately, we’ll probably never meet these aliens. According to a study published in April, a planet with 10 times Earth’s mass would also be subject to 2.4 times Earth’s escape velocity — and overcoming that pull could make rocket launches and space travel near impossible. space science universe and space station alien science

“On more-massive planets, spaceflight would be exponentially more expensive,” study author Michael Hippke, a researcher affiliated with the Sonneberg Observatory in Germany, previously told Live Science. “Instead, [those aliens] would be to some extent arrested on their home planet.” space science universe and space station alien science

Prev1 of 6Next

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *