10 Most Expensive Paintings Ever Sold At Auction

“WOMAN AS LANDSCAPE” BY WILLEM DE KOONING (1954 – 1955)

Willem de Kooning is another male artist that often used women as inspiration for much of his paintings. Kooning emerged as a prominent artist in the 20th century. When he first displayed his work in the 50s, it became controversial and shook the art world at its core. Other artists at the time, also illustrated the idea of a progressive woman as well. Accordingly, great artists like Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp began to alter the perception of women as beautiful, fragile beings to strong and complex individuals. According to art scholars, His 1950’s Woman as Landscape oil painting was perhaps one of the artists interesting pieces, showcasing the abstract portrait of a woman that “commands” the viewer’s attention. Kooning’s work was deserving of the $60 million it received at auction back in the fall of 2018!

“SAVIOR OF THE WORLD” BY LEONARDO DE VINCI (1500)

Art is expensive and can cost almost as much as buying a large estate in L.A. With there being a hefty price tag on many of these pieces, it’s no wonder someone would be willing to steal them. In 2017, the last remaining piece from 14-15th century Renaissance painter Leonardo De Vinci’s, called Savior of the World, was stolen from the Saudi Arabian Prince, of all people. Though the disappearance of De Vinci’s artwork remains a strange story, leading to the speculation that it may have not have even been stolen in the first place. Originally, the piece was acquired by a big-time Russian businessman from a Swiss Art Dealer, before being put on auction in 2017 at Christie’s Sale in New York. After a telephone bidding war ended with the Prince of Saudi Arabia winning the piece for $450 million, things went downhill. The painting was scheduled to be displayed at The Louvre Abu Dhabi, an art and civilization museum, but at the time the painting had gone missing. Even stranger is that the museum hasn’t sought any police assistance for the recovery of the painting, further validating the assumption that it isn’t lost at all. It could just be a publicity stunt!

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